Glossary O - S

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OBSTETRIC RECORDS
Maternity care records including cases of stillbirth, Child Death and children born with a handicap.

OFFICE OF THE e-ENVOY
e Government Unit, Cabinet Office, Stockley House, 130 Wilton Road, London SWIV 1LQ.

ONE –OFF ENQUIRIES
Single enquiries not related to any previous issue or correspondence.

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PATIENT RECORD
A collection of documents that provides an account of each episode in which a patient visited or sought treatment and received care or a referral for care from a health care facility. All recorded information regarding a patient's clinical history, examination findings, diagnosis, treatment, and consent.

PAPER RECORDS
Records in the form of files, volumes, folders, bundles, maps, plans, charts, etc.

PECS CHECKS
PECS stood for the Pre-Employment Consultant Service. The Pre-Employment Consultant Service was operated by DHSSPS from 1983 until April 2005. A PECS check was a mechanism for organisations intending to employ individuals to work with children or adults with learning disability to carry out a check of individual’s criminal record history and whether they were included on the PECS Register.
PECS was placed on a statutory basis by the Protection of Children & Vulnerable Adults (NI) Order 2003 (POCVA). From April 2005 PECS checks were replaced by POCVA checks. From April 2008 Access NI took over the disclosure process with POCVA checks being replaced by Enhanced Disclosures. POCVA was repealed in October 2009 (with exception of a few savings provisions) by the Safeguarding Vulnerable Groups (NI) Order 2007.

PERMANENT RETENTION
Records may not ordinarily be retained for more than 20 years. However, the Public Records Act provides for records which are still in current use to be legally retained. Additionally, under separate legislation, records may need to be retained for longer than 30 years, for example Occupational Health Records relating to the COSHH (Control of Substances Hazardous to Health) Regulations, or records required for variant CJD surveillance.
Section 33 of the Data Protection Act permits personal data identified as being of historical or statistical research value to be kept indefinitely as archives.

PERMANENT SECRETARY
The administrative head of the Department working directly to the Minister.

PERSONAL DATA GUARDIAN
The Personal Data Guardian is a senior person responsible for protecting the confidentiality of patient and service-user information and enabling appropriate information-sharing. The Guardian plays a key role in ensuring that responsibilities with partner organisations satisfy the highest practicable standards for handling patient identifiable information.

POCVA
Protection of Children and Vulnerable Adults.

PROTECTION OF CHILDREN AND VULNERABLE ADULTS
Protection of Children and Vulnerable Adults (Northern Ireland) Order commenced on 1st April 2005 and enhanced the arrangements for safeguarding vulnerable members of society by providing a legislative basis (The Protection of Children and Vulnerable Adults (NI) Order 2003) for pre-employment checking and for maintaining two lists:

PRECEDENT CASE
Something with a wider importance than its own immediate circumstances or something carried out, used, researched, trialled, which may serve as an example to authorise a subsequent act of the same kind e.g.:
A case which establishes legal principles to a certain set of facts, coming to a certain conclusion, and which is to be followed from that point on when similar or identical facts are before a court.

PRESERVATION
Processes and operations involved in ensuring the technical and intellectual survival of authentic records through time. (BS ISO 15489-1:2001(E)).

PRIVATE PATIENTS
A patient who pays for medical treatment or advice, rather than receiving it free through the government's system.
Article 31 of the Health and Personal Social Services Order 1972 (known as the 1972 Order), authorises HSC hospital accommodation and services to be used by private patients - it appears that under this provision the patient continues to be treated as a private patient whilst in hospital. Article 33 of the 1972 Order provides for Trusts to be able to charge for hospital accommodation. A patient who pays for a single room under Article 33 of the 1972 Order is still receiving treatment under the HSC.

PROTECTIVE MARKING
The process of determining security and privacy restrictions on records.

PUBLIC RECORDS
Records as defined in the Public Records Act 1958 or subsequently determined as public records by The National Archives.
Records of NHS organisations (and those of predecessor bodies to NHS organisations) are defined as public records under the terms of the Public Records Act 1958 sections 3(1)–(2). NHS records are not owned by the NHS organisation that created them and may not be retained for longer than 30 years without formal approval by The National Archives. (The National Archives).  Records of services supplied within NHS organisations but by outside contractors are not defined as public records, but are subject to the Freedom of Information Act.

PROTECTIVELY MARKED FILES
Categories of file markings depending on the level of security required for the material.

PUBLIC RECORDS ACT (NI) 1923
All files created by public servants as part of their everyday work, are defined as public records under the terms of the Public Records Act (NI) 1923.

PUBLIC RECORD OFFICE OF NORTHERN IRELAND (PRONI)
The Public Records Act (Northern Ireland) 1923 established PRONI as the national archive for Northern Ireland with authority to receive those records of government departments and public bodies which are deemed worthy of permanent preservation. PRONI is part of the Department of Culture, Arts and Leisure.

PUBLICATION SCHEME
A publication scheme is required of all HSC organisations under the Freedom of Information Act 2000. It details information which is available to the public now or will be in the future, where it can be obtained from and the format it is or will be available in. Schemes must be approved by the Information Commissioner and reviewed periodically to make sure they are accurate and up to date.


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RAMPTON HOSPITAL
Rampton Secure Hospital is home to some of the most dangerous people in Britain, with 3 out of 4 of its 400 patients responsible for very serious crime.  Postal address: Rampton Hospital, Retford, Nottinghamshire DN22 0PD.

RECORDS
Information created, received and maintained as evidence and information by an organisation or person, in pursuance of legal obligations, or in the transaction of business. (BS ISO 15489.1) A record of an Organisation is anything which contains information (in any media) which has been created or gathered as a result of any aspect of the work of its employees – including consultants, agency or casual staff.

RECORDS MANAGEMENT
Field of management responsible for the efficient and systematic control of the creation, receipt, maintenance, use and disposition of records, including processes for capturing and maintaining evidence of and information about business activities and transactions in the form of records. (BS ISO 15489-1:2001(E)).

RECORD SERIES
A series is the main grouping of records with a common function or subject – formerly known as ‘class’. (The National Archives).  Documents arranged in accordance with a filing system or maintained as a unit because they result from the same accumulation or filing process, or the same activity, because they have a particular form, or because of some other relationship arising out of their creation, receipt or use. (International Council on Archives’(ICA) General International Standard Archival Description or ISAD(G)).
A series comprises the record of all the activities that are instances of a single process. A series may be large or small, it is distinguished not by its size, but by the fact that it provides evidence of a particular process. If an activity takes place that is unique, rather than an instance of a process, its records form a series in their own right. (Elizabeth Shepherd and Geoffrey Yeo, Managing Records: a handbook of principles and practice (Facet 2003)).

RECORD SYSTEM/RECORD-KEEPING SYSTEM
An information system which captures, manages and provides access to records through time. (The National Archives, Records Management: Standards and Guidance – Introduction Standards for the Management of Government Records) Records created by the organisation should be arranged in a record-keeping system that will enable the organisation to obtain the maximum benefit from the quick and easy retrieval of information. Record-keeping systems should contain descriptive and technical documentation to enable the system and the records to be understood and to be operated efficiently, and to provide an administrative context for effective management of the records, including a documented set of rules for referencing, titling, indexing and, if appropriate, the protective marking of records. These should be easily understood to enable the efficient retrieval of information and to maintain security and confidentiality.

REDACTION
The process of removing, withholding or hiding parts of a record due to either the application of a Freedom of Information Act exemption or a decision by PRONI after consultation with the Responsible Authority to restrict access where sensitivity, copyright or data protection issues arise.

REGISTER
An official written (either on hard copy or computer) record of names or events or transactions.

REGISTRATION
Registration is the act of giving a record a unique identifier on its entry into a record-keeping system.

RETENTION
The continued storage and maintenance of records for as long as they are required by the creating or holding organisation until their eventual disposal, according to their administrative, legal, financial and historical evaluation.

REVERSE BOOK METHOD
Practice of filing the latest paper on top of a series of papers.

REVIEW
The examination of records to determine whether they should be destroyed, retained for a further period or transferred to PRONI.

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SERIOUS ADVERSE RELATED INCIDENT
An adverse incident is an event which causes, or has the potential to cause, unexpected or unwanted effects involving the safety of patients, staff, users and other people.

SERVICE
The term can mean unit, business area, branch, division, directorate, department.  It is the term used to define the breakdown of groups of people with the same purpose within the organisation. The name used for the breakdown within organisations can differ.

SERVICE LEVEL AGREEMENT
An agreement between parties setting out the agreed level of service. Usually a supplementary document to a contract.

SHANNON CLINIC
A medium secure unit within Knockbracken Health Care Park, Saintfield Road, Belfast BT8 8BH to accommodate 34 patients.

SIRO
Senior Information Risk Owner

SPECIAL CATEGORY RECORDS
A class of material that may need special arrangements for registration or review.

SPENT CONVICTIONS
"A spent conviction is one which is spent within the meaning of the Rehabilitation of Offenders ( Northern Ireland ) Order 1978".
That order provides that after a specified time has elapsed, varying in accordance with the severity of the sentence passed on the offender, a conviction is spent and must no longer be referred to. However a life sentence is never spent and for certain purposes such a vetting for people to work with children even convictions which would ordinarily be considered " spent" are not.

SUBJECT ACCESS REQUEST
A written signed request for information made by an individual to a person or organisation that they believe holds the information, to see the information held about them.

SUPERVISION ORDER
A Supervision Order is one of the sentences that a Court can give to a young person aged between 10 and 17 years to help a young person so that they cannot re-offend.